Tuesday, July 3, 2012

I look Canadian...will I have to show my ID in Utah?

"Reasonable Suspicion" could make you show proof of citizenship.

 

In addition to my American Dialect, I speak three languages, English, Canadian and Australian and I am worried about being jailed because I might accidentally leave my ID at home when I go to the store to buy milk, bread and an American Flag for Independence Day.

Last week the Supreme Court let stand the most controversial portion of Arizona's anti-immigration law that requires those detained to show proof that they can legally walk on US soil if an officer has "reasonable suspicion" that they aren't in Americas melting-pot legally.  If the accused can't show proof  that they are in the US legally they can be detained..aka arrested and thrown in a stinky, filthy jail. (OK, they might not ALL be stinky or filthy) What happened with innocent until proven guilty?

Huh? What is reasonable suspicion? Is it the color of somebody's skin? Is it if they have an accent? Is it if they have a 3-1 ratio of Taco Bell to McDonald's garbage in the back seat of the car? Does a gun rack on a pickup truck with a confederate flag give you a pass?

Did you know that 5 other states have already passed laws that are similar to Arizona's Law; Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, South Carolina and Utah. That is just embarrassing...nobody like a copycat.

OK, I am afraid to travel in Utah and not just because I am afraid of running into Mitt Romney supporters but for fear of being labeled a Canadian. Oh wait that is silly, the law is obviously an attempt at reaching out to our Mexican friends and letting them know how much we appreciate them by allowing our officers to get to know them personally. If this law was enforced because Donald Trump or Mitt Romney looks English, I would suspect that the law wouldn't be in existence now.

C'mon America...we are better than legally allowing (actually forcing) our police men and women to racially profile people based on skin color.

Here is a link to the Supreme Court Decision. Tell me what you think.